Don’t miss this important movie screening!

Movie Screening

Hometown Habitat, Stories of Bringing Nature Home

November 5, 2016
7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Cabela’s, S. Barrington

“Finally, a film that examines the critical role that native plants play in our landscapes. Hometown Habitat, featuring Douglas Tallamy, explores our land ethic and how we need to make radical changes in our plant selections to increase biodiversity, heal the earth, and find harmony with nature. This documentary should be included in every school curriculum.”
—Heather Holm, author of Pollinators of Native Plants
hometown-habitat-film


Hometown Habitat
is a 90-minute environmental education documentary film showing how and why native plants are critical to the survival and vitality of local ecosystems. Entomologist Doug Tallamy, whose research, books and lectures on the benefits of native plants in landscaping, provides the narrative thread throughout the film. The message: Each individual has the power to conserve resources, restore habitat for wildlife and bring beauty to their patch of earth.

This movie fosters the mission of The Meadow Project to educate and raise awareness about sustainable, native, healthy, easy and affordable land care practices that support wildlife and human life.

We hope to see you there. Bring a friend!

BACT Supports Tower Lakes in Green Initiatives.

Rain GardenBarrington Area Conservation Trust applauds the community of Tower Lakes in their efforts to be a truly green community.  BACT was present at Tower Lakes’ second annual Eco Day where they joined other conservation-minded organizations in support of Tower Lakes’ sustainable decision-making.
BACT Executive Director, Lisa Woolford, was the keynote speaker at this years’ event.  Woolford talked about the ways the Conservation Trust has supported Tower Lakes over the years. (Click here to view the presentation slides.)
In 2012, BACT contributed $200,000 to help purchase a 15.5 acre oak woodland located off Route 59 in Tower Lakes.  While the Village of Tower Lakes and Cuba Township co-own the property, BACT holds a conservation easement on the land that will protect it in its current natural state forever.
BACT founded the Tower Lake Drain Watershed Partnership in order to support efforts to improve water quality in this area.  Through its Conservation@Home program, BACT has visited dozens of homes in the Tower Lakes community assisting individual landowners with sustainable options for their own backyards.
BACT continues to support the Tower Lakes community, as well as the communities in the greater Barrington area, to preserve our community’s rare and exceptional open spaces for current and future generations.White pelicans

 

Native Plant Sale

Order trees & shrubs now through May 1 and order rain barrels as well!

Rain garden design & installation by Ringers Landscaping.

Landscaping with native trees, shrubs, and plants in strategic parts of your yard (in partnership with your turf grass) adds beauty as well as conservation benefits.

Order pick-up is scheduled for Friday, May 20 between noon and 3:00 p.m. in the parking lot at Barrington Village Hall.

To get started with a home consultation, click here or contact our Conservation@Home coordinator Beth Adler at (847) 387-3149.

 

 

BACT Conservation@Home Receives Award

On the evening of December 2, Lake County Stormwater Management Commission honored BACT’s Conservation@Home program with their 2015 Education, Outreach, and Media Award.

Mike Warner, Beth Adler, Lisa Woolford, Steve Mountsier

Mike Warner, Beth Adler, Lisa Woolford, Steve Mountsier

The Conservation@Home program affects water quality in the Fox River Watershed by educating, assisting and recognizing landowners who strive to maintain their land using conservation practices that benefit wildlife, water quality, and the environment.

Michael D. Warner, Executive Director of Lake County Stormwater Management Commission commented that the “program’s success lies in providing landowners with feedback and guidance on ways to improve their properties to better manage stormwater runoff and provide healthy habitat”.  He also commended BACT for “reaching out and educating other groups on conservation values”.

 

Fox River Grove District 3 receives Conservation@ School Certification

FRG C@School ErikEricBethBrandonWhen students at two schools in Fox River Grove District 3 came back to school this fall, they were greeted with a beautiful natural landscape that now supports native plants, wildlife, and sustainable habitats.

Both Fox River Grove Middle School and Algonquin Road Elementary School were recently awarded Conservation@School certification by the Barrington Area Conservation Trust for their work with Ringers Landscaping to transform the schools’ outdoor areas into extensions of the classroom that provide educational opportunities about our environment and the world in which we live.

 

Continue reading

Welcome spring with a Conservation@Home visit

Let us help you find the right plants for your yard

sidebar-native-plantsLet’s face it, the snow isn’t going to be around forever and you’re going to have to deal with the spot where nothing seems to grow because it’s too shady, too sunny, or too wet.

Why keep struggling with turf or annuals when you can find native perennials that can blanket that “trouble spot” with beauty season after season, year after year?

Native plants are sustainable plants adapted to the local climate, which provide year round interest and color, and habitat for wildlife, while providing practical assistance with backyard stormwater management.

A Conservation@Home visit allows you to ask questions and get answers to native landscape questions that pertain to your specific needs. A free service to all BACT members, and $25 for non-members, a Conservation@Home visit provides practical solutions to your home landscape conundrums from experienced professional naturalists.

Schedule your visit today by calling Beth Adler at (847) 387-3149.

 

Planting seeds & harvesting rain

In his book, Bringing Nature Home, entomologist Doug Tallamy writes, “native plants support and produce more insects than alien plants and therefore more numbers and species of other animals (such as birds, amphibians, small mammals).” While it may seem undesirable to find sporadic holes in the leaves of your plants, the insects that made these holes are essential to the food web. “The self-sustaining balance we seek in garden communities is only achieved through complexity.” Continue reading